Let’s Talk About Sexual Violence in the Military

The American military is an institution founded in patriotism and shrouded in the mystique of brotherhood and love of country. I’m grateful for the important and life-threatening responsibilities that the men and women of our military undertake on a daily basis. I also know that it’s something I could never do. The aim of this post is not to question the bravery of those who serve our country but to express my anger with how the U.S. military handles instances of sexual assault.

I read an alarming statistic the other day in my research about sexual assault in the military — a female soldier is more likely to be assaulted by a fellow soldier than killed in combat. Also, women make up 15% of armed forces, but 47% of sexual assault cases. Although women are ‘allowed’ to serve in the military along side men, in terms of their own bodily autonomy they are certainly not equal.

Soldiers — both men and women — who report sexual assault are subjected to lifelong consequences that affect their physical and emotional wellbeing as well as their career. Ninety percent of sexual assault survivors in the armed forces are involuntarily discharged. The perpetrators of these crimes aren’t usually punished in any way. In fact, 80% of those accused are actually discharged with honor.

I recently rediscovered an article in Huffington Post that lists 50 powerful and eye opening statistics about sexual assault in the military — and links to the original articles and research for your reference. I found that reading these statistics and other studies and watching “The Invisible War,” has made me realize how frequently sexual assault occurs in the military and that it’s a huge problem we have yet to solve.

We’d love to hear feedback from anyone who has served in the armed forces about their experiences with sexual assault — whether it was something you witnessed, experienced, or came across while you were serving. If you have something to contribute, please sound off in the comments or Tweet to us at @Minnesota_NOW using the hashtag #NotInvisible.

We are co-sponsoring a screening of the Invisible War on November 17th at St. Anthony Main Theater, and hosting a discussion with a panel of experts after our screening. If you haven’t seen The Invisible War, or even if you have, I highly suggest you make the time to watch it with us — we need folks from all perspectives to truly create a well-rounded discussion.

Get your tickets here!

Advertisements

Paycheck to Paycheck and Economic Justice

Economic justice is one of Minnesota NOW’s core issues, a term that encompasses a number of concerns including education, livable wages, job discrimination, pay equity, housing, childcare and more.

On Tuesday, October 21st, Minnesota NOW’s Economic Justice Committee hosted a screening and discussion of the film Paycheck to Paycheck: The Life and Times of Katrina Gilbert. The film follows Katrina Gilbert, a mother of three who experiences numerous setbacks in her struggle to secure economic stability for herself and her children.

Katrina works as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) where she makes $9.49 an hour. Similar to many single mothers living in poverty, she is forced to make hard choices about things like which bills to pay and what healthcare services to forego so that she has enough money left to provide the necessities for her family. She wants a better life for her kids, and decides to go back to school to help her achieve that goal, only to have her financial aid application rejected.

Katrina is one of millions of single mothers living in poverty in the United States. Stories like hers are not uncommon, even here in Minnesota. Below is a selection of statistics from the economics section of the Status of Minnesota Women and Girls report (2014):

  • Women make up the majority (60%) of low-wage workers in Minnesota, many of whom do not have access to paid sick days.
  • Sixty-seven percent (67%) of female-headed households in rental housing and 49% of those who own their home are paying costs that exceed the recommended 30% of their income.
  • Minnesota has the third highest cost in the United States for quality childcare, making it difficult for working mothers and families to balance the responsibilities of work and family.
  • There are more than twice as many Minnesota elder women living in poverty than men (38,463 compared to 16,915).

These statistics, and the full report linked above, show how far we have left to go in the fight for economic justice.

Legislation like the Women’s Economic Security Act (WESA), signed into law during the last legislative session, is a good start. Minnesota NOW will continue to fight for economic justice, and we’d love for you to join us.

  1. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and share with your friends.
  2. Join our Action Committee. We’re got big plans for 2015, and we need a team of fired up advocates to help us out!
  3. Make a donation. We are a volunteer run organization, and make the most of every dollar.

To learn more about Minnesota NOW and to become a member go to our website.